Harvest Monday August 27, 2018

Welcome to Harvest Monday, where we celebrate all things harvest related. It’s hard to believe summer is almost over. The school buses going by every morning to the nearby grade school is a sure sign though. Right on cue with the season, I brought in more of the winter squashes last week, plus another tromboncino. It’s the same players as last week, with three each of Tetsukabuto and Thelma Sanders along with one more small Gill’s Golden Pippin.

Tromboncino and winter squashes

Tromboncino and winter squashes

Speaking of tromboncino squash, my homemade trellis has done a good job of keeping them contained this year. I fasten a 4 x 8 foot sheet of concrete reinforcing mesh to metal t-posts, and secure it using zip ties. I got the idea from Michelle (From Seed To Table), who uses it for her vining squash too. Whenever the vines start to wander, I guide them back to the trellis. I have pinched out the tips of some of them to get them to branch out and to rein them in. The trellis also has the advantage of keeping the squash up off the ground where they are easier to see and less likely to rot.

tromboncino vines on trellis

tromboncino vines on trellis

The eggplant and peppers are still fruiting for me. The striped Nubia and white skinned Clara are ones I’m growing for the first time, and I like them both. We’ve been grilling most of these. Along with the eggplant are two different peppers, Orange Blaze and the red mini bell Sweetie Pie. Both are AAS Winners, Orange Blaze back in 2011 and Sweetie Pie in 2017. It’s my first time growing Sweetie Pie, and I like what I see so far. The plant is loaded with peppers in what is likely going to be a so-so year otherwise for peppers here.

eggplant and peppers

eggplant and peppers

Some peppers are doing great however, like the Kaleidoscope baccatum pepper I overwintered indoors then set out in the ground in late May. It is truly loaded with peppers, which are red when ripe and have only a slight bit of heat. I usually pickle these like I do the Peppadew peppers, and that’s what I will do with this batch. Once pickled we use them on salads, sandwiches and as a pizza topping. I am saving seeds from this variety and hope to have them available for a giveaway later this year.

Kaleidoscope hot peppers

Kaleidoscope hot peppers

The pole beans are still setting pods, no doubt happy in the somewhat cooler weather we’ve had lately. A little rain surely perked them up too. It’s the Appalachian heirloom beans NT Half Runner and Bertie Best Greasy Beans in the below photo.

NT Half Runner and Bertie Best Greasy Beans

NT Half Runner and Bertie Best Greasy Beans

Bertie Best Greasy Bean is an heirloom from North Carolina that makes fairly small pods that plump up quickly with the beans inside. They have strings, and the pods cook up tender even when the beans get large and the pods start to mature. ‘Greasy beans’ are so named because the pods have a slick feel to them, lacking the fuzz usually present on a snap bean pod.

Bertie Best Greasy Beans

Bertie Best Greasy Beans

The slicing tomatoes have come to a screeching halt here. And I pulled the determinate paste tomatoes to make room for a fall planting of Red Racer and Defiant tomatoes. Also slowing down but not stopping yet are my Juliet vines, and I got another bucket full of them last week, just shy of four pounds worth. I’m roasting these up to turn into tomato sauce, after saving a few of them for fresh use. They already made an appearance on pork carnitas last night. And they will also show up on a salad we’re having for lunch today.

Juliet tomatoes

Juliet tomatoes

In the future harvests department, our pawpaw trees have a few fruits hanging on them still. I’m not sure if the trees are large enough to support the fruits, so I’m not surprised a few fell off. I’m keeping my fingers crossed we get to taste at least one of them this year.

pawpaw fruit on the tree

pawpaw fruit on the tree

And finally, I baked a loaf of sourdough bread last year in my clay baker. I’m thinking of donating one of these for an upcoming rummage/bake sale. I can see more ‘practice’ loaves might be necessary too!

no-knead sourdough bread

no-knead sourdough bread

Harvest Monday is a day to show off your harvests, how you are saving your harvest, or how you are using your harvest. If you have a harvest of any size or shape you want to share, add your name and blog link to Mr Linky below. And please be sure and check out what everyone is harvesting!

 

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10 Responses to Harvest Monday August 27, 2018

  1. Sue Garrett says:

    I’ve seen pepperdew peppers in recipes but never known what they were. Are they different to sweet peppers which I have always used in their place?

    How exciting to have pawpaws!

    • Dave @ HappyAcres says:

      The peppadews are a specific variety of C. baccatum peppers that are mildly hot and thin walled. They are usually pickled in a sweet brine.

  2. Will - Eight Gate Farm - NH says:

    I remember seeing that trellis Michelle rigged up. Good to see it works well for you too. Sorry your determinates have wound down, but it’s cool that you have time to start more tomatoes. I like the look of the Kaleidoscope peppers, are these mildly hot too? And I hope you get some ripe pawpaws. I’ve thought of growing them, but not sure I want the commitment.

    • Dave @ HappyAcres says:

      This year the Kaleidoscopes seem to have almost no heat. I got enough of the paste tomatoes to fill the freezer, so I was ready for them to go anyway. I am hoping we get some pawpaws before I am too old to go out and pick them!

  3. Margaret says:

    How exciting about the paw paws!! My tomatoes are still going strong, but I’m not sure how long that will last – we’ve been having quite a bit of rain around here and conditions are ripe for blight to start taking over. I’ve never thought about donating bread to a bake sale – that’s a wonderful idea!

  4. Ruth Bechtle-Pierce says:

    So glad to see the picture of the paw paws! It has been a very rainy summer in Western PA and tomatoes have been delayed. I have lovely tomato plants with lots of green tomatoes. I might have my first ripe one by Labor Day! On a more positive note, my herbs and Jimmy Nardello peppers are doing great. We love to fry the Jimmy Nardellos as a side dish.

  5. Joy Simpson says:

    Bertie Best Greasy Beans has to be the bet named vegetable ever! I have never heard of greasy beans so will have a look round and see if they are available in the UK. I had never had pickled chilli peppers until a few weeks ago and they were so delicious so i may have a go for the first time this year.

  6. Phuong says:

    Your garden seems to be holding up well in the heat. I can’t believe how hot it has gotten again. Those are some good sized paw paws, I’ll keep my fingers crossed that you’ll get to try some and hopefully share what you think of them. Winter squashes are such pretty creatures and that long straight Trombocino is an impressive specimen.

    There’s not much left from summer in my garden, just peppers, sweet potatoes, kale, and leeks. I’ll probably post a little tour in a couple days of the fall garden.

  7. Denver says:

    That’s how I trellis my vining things too! But my trombocino won’t be contained / I have done a verry poor job of training or trimming. It easily over grew my 8 foot trellis (I stack two of those mesh panels on top of each other horizontally and then use t posts/ plastic stakes woven through to keep them upright). It has grown about ten feet away into my shed and also into the neighbors yard. She keeps pointedly shoving it back over the fence.

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