Harvest Monday August 20, 2018

Welcome to Harvest Monday, where we celebrate all things harvest related. It’s still tomato season here, and they are still keeping me busy processing them. On Wednesday I harvested a gallon bucket of Juliet, almost five pounds total. The vines have slowed down a bit, but that’s okay by me since I’ve gotten plenty off my plants already. In addition to fresh use, so far I’ve made Juliet into sauces and I’ve dehydrated them.

Juliet tomatoes

Juliet tomatoes

I turned all of this batch into Slow Roasted Tomatoes. For that I cut them in half, spread them out on three baking sheets, drizzled with olive oil then baked for three hours in a 250°F oven. It made four cups of roasted tomatoes, and I put them into the freezer for later use. We use these on pasta and pizza, and in casseroles where they give a big tomato taste. You could also add herbs or salt before roasting, but I find they have plenty of flavor by themselves.

slow-roasted Juliet tomatoes

slow-roasted Juliet tomatoes

I also got enough paste tomatoes to make a batch of Roasted Tomato Sauce. It’s a mix of varieties here, including Marzano Fire which has been a shy producer for me this year. This has been a year when the hybrid tomatoes have really shown their worth, and many (or most) of the open-pollinated ones have done poorly. I will take that into consideration when planning next year’s garden, and many of the ones that failed to perform this year will not be back. Tough love is sometimes needed in the garden!

paste tomatoes

paste tomatoes

For slicing tomatoes, a whole bunch of the Garden Treasures came ripe about the same time. These hybrid red slicers have a great taste, and always produce well for me. The seed is not available commercially at present, but Proven Winners should be selling the seed and plants next year for Garden Treasure and Garden Gem. Meanwhile I have enough seed to plant both here next year, and I plan to do just that. I got my seeds by making a $10 donation to the University of Florida tomato breeding program, but I’m not sure what seeds they are giving out now.

Garden Treasure tomatoes

Garden Treasure tomatoes

Garden Treasure

Garden Treasure

Several of the winter squashes seemed ready to harvest last week, so I brought them inside to cure. I cut two Tromba d’Albenga while I was at it. They’re hanging out with a Tetsukabuto, four Thelma Sanders and five Gill’s Golden Pippin squashes. It’s my first time growing the heirloom acorn squash Gill’s Golden Pippin. According to the listing at Adaptive Seeds (where I got my seeds), they are “five times more flavorful than most acorn squash, but about half the size.” Even allowing for the usual seed company hyperbole, I am hopeful they will be a tasty addition to our winter squash lineup.

assortment of squashes

assortment of squashes

I grew Thelma Sanders last year and we really enjoyed it roasted, but some were too large to enjoy in one sitting. The smaller size of Gill’s Golden Pippin should be a plus in the kitchen. I’ll let them cure for about a month before we get our first taste of them.

Gill's Golden Pippin squash

Gill’s Golden Pippin squash

I got a more hot peppers last week, including the aptly named Kimchi and Gochugaru plus a lot of the Thai Bird peppers. All three of these are growing in containers and giving me plenty of peppers for drying. I dehydrated the Thai peppers whole, but ground up the Kimchi and Gochugaru after saving seeds from them and dehydrating. I’m getting a good amount of ground pepper flakes for making kimchi later on when I have cabbage from the garden.

Kimchi, Gochugaru and Thai Bird hot peppers

Kimchi, Gochugaru and Thai Bird hot peppers

I also got a big harvest of Cayennetta hot peppers. I’ve also got these 2012 AAS Winners growing in a container, where they do quite well for me. I’m going to turn these into a homemade Chili Garlic Sauce, but first I’m going to ferment them for about a week. Fermenting gives them a bit of extra flavor, and it also means the finished sauce will keep longer. I’ll be cutting the peppers in half then salting overnight (5% salt by weight) before packing in a jar to ferment, as I described a few years back in Fermented Pepper Mash. After fermenting the peppers can also easily be turned into hot sauce.

Cayennetta peppers

Cayennetta peppers

I’m still saving seed from select pepper varieties that I have isolated to prevent cross pollination. This time it was Aji Angelo, a mildly hot red baccatum pepper. I got quite a few seeds from the five peppers, then I added them to the Cayennetta peppers for fermenting. I decided to add a watermark to the below photo because my pics of Aji Angelo peppers have been stolen more than a dozen times and used to sell seeds on Ebay, Amazon and recently a Swedish seed company. I’d be happy to let them use my pics, if they would only ask!

Aji Angelo peppers

Aji Angelo peppers

The pole beans haven’t slowed down yet, and one new face made an appearance last week. I got a pound of the NT Half Runner beans. These are another of the heirloom beans I am growing from the Sustainable Mountain Agriculture Center. The NT stand for “non-tough”, and are a special strain of half runner beans that remain tender even when the pods are full and the beans inside are big.

NT Half Runner beans

NT Half Runner beans

I’m getting a steady supply of the purple podded Bluehilde beans now too. And as Lou (Rainbow Chard) pointed out last week, the pods on mine are a bit flatter than hers, which tells me perhaps the strain is a bit variable. Some of mine are more round than others, so that would seem to be the case. In the below photo I’m holding a couple of the really flat pods I found. Some of mine do have strings, despite the Baker Creek catalog listing that says they are “stringless, even at 10 inches long”. Oh well, I don’t mind stringing them, since many of the other pole beans I’m growing have strings. I have had issues in the past with Baker Creek seeds not being true to type, so who knows if I really have Blauhilde bean or not!

Blauhilde beans

Blauhilde beans

Harvest Monday is a day to show off your harvests, how you are saving your harvest, or how you are using your harvest. If you have a harvest of any size or shape you want to share, add your name and blog link to Mr Linky below. And please be sure and check out what everyone is harvesting!

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13 Responses to Harvest Monday August 20, 2018

  1. Joy Simpson says:

    Interesting comments about Marzano Fire tomatoes. My San Marzano have been OK-ish this year but not fantastic. I might look out for a different sort of tomato that will do the same job.

  2. Sue Garrett says:

    We haven’t grown plum tomatoes for a while. I seem to remember that they didn’t do very well for us. Maybe we should try again.
    I’ll have to look into the smaller squashes as we grow Crown Prince which produces huge fruits. We can never use the whole fruit and end up resorting to freezing. Other than that it is a good variety.

  3. Phuong says:

    You’re still getting an amazing amount of tomatoes. Ours have long since been cleared out of the garden. And it probably would’ve been a good year for us to grow squashes since vine borers were nonexistent. I’m very curious what you think of Gill’s Golden Pippin when you get a chance to try it.

  4. Will - Eight Gate Farm - NH says:

    I’m constantly amazed at the productivity you get from Juliet. How many plants do you have? Actually, how many plants do you have of each variety? Because you sure out-produce me! The squashes all look so good. And I think I’d like to try Cayennetta next year. How would you rate the heat?

    • Dave @ HappyAcres says:

      Cayennetta is not as hot as most cayennes. I’d put it more in the jalapeno category for heat. I have 4 Juliets in 2 oversize cages. And I have 8 short-vine paste tomato plants.

  5. Ann Ryder says:

    Dave, have you ever tried the Tromba d’Albenga as a ripe winter squash? If so, how did you like it?

    • Dave @ HappyAcres says:

      I have let the Tromba get ripe, and it’s good that way. I usually pick them green though since we have other winter squashes I grow.

  6. Denver says:

    I have a late season Juliet I planted, but we’ll see how the fruit taste. “Fall” here is a crap shoot. That’s wild about stealing your pictures for seeds!

  7. Loving seeing your chilli harvest, which is a few weeks ahead of ours here. Our Thelma Sander are ready to pick too… one of our favourite squashes. The NT half bean are are new to me… wonder if they are available in the UK? They sounds excellent!

  8. shaheen says:

    They look like blauhilde beans to me, having grown them this year and years ago. Your winter squash haul is pretty amazing, I have one winter squash plant in and there is nothing on it – just the vine, but the courgettes are still giving and the marrows!
    PS I know its Tuesday, but I have linked up a day late.

    • Dave @ HappyAcres says:

      Thanks for the confirmation on Blauhilde, Shaheen. It’s been a good bean for me this year and I will likely grow it again.

  9. That’s a lotta toms Dave! Yes, funnily enough with the blauhilde beans I’ve had a few flatter ones this week, I wonder why they vary – rain? I’ve started to get some yellow nectar gold climbing beans this week, first time I’ve grown them, and I really want to grow a tromba squash variety next year, they look amazing, I’ll add it to my seed list right now.
    It must’ve been a surprise to see your photos being used, like you say, at least they could’ve asked.
    (I haven’t had chance to write a blog post this week so will hopefully join in properly again next time).

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